Medical Conditions

Depression

Depression

Overview

Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. To be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.

Some forms of depression are slightly different, or they may develop under unique circumstances, such as:

  • Persistent depressive disorder (also called dysthymia) is a depressed mood that lasts for at least two years. A person diagnosed with persistent depressive disorder may have episodes of major depression along with periods of less severe symptoms, but symptoms must last for two years to be considered persistent depressive disorder.
  • Postpartum depression is much more serious than the “baby blues” (relatively mild depressive and anxiety symptoms that typically clear within two weeks after delivery) that many women experience after giving birth. Women with postpartum depression experience full-blown major depression during pregnancy or after delivery (postpartum depression). The feelings of extreme sadness, anxiety, and exhaustion that accompany postpartum depression may make it difficult for these new mothers to complete daily care activities for themselves and/or for their babies.
  • Psychotic depression occurs when a person has severe depression plus some form of psychosis, such as having disturbing false fixed beliefs (delusions) or hearing or seeing upsetting things that others cannot hear or see (hallucinations). The psychotic symptoms typically have a depressive “theme,” such as delusions of guilt, poverty, or illness.
  • Seasonal affective disorder is characterized by the onset of depression during the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. This depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Winter depression, typically accompanied by social withdrawal, increased sleep, and weight gain, predictably returns every year in seasonal affective disorder.
  • Bipolar disorder is different from depression, but it is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extremely low moods that meet the criteria for major depression (called “bipolar depression”). But a person with bipolar disorder also experiences extreme high – euphoric or irritable – moods called “mania” or a less severe form called “hypomania.”

Examples of other types of depressive disorders newly added to the diagnostic classification of DSM-5 include disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (diagnosed in children and adolescents) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Read more information here at NIMH.

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Practice News

Pediatric Affiliates has decided to terminate its contract with the UnitedHealthcare Community Plan effective June 30, 2019.  We will continue to accept a number of NJ FamilyCare plans offered by other insurance carriers including Aetna Better Health, Amerigroup, and Wellcare. 

Pediatric Affiliates has strived to offer the best possible care to its patients for over 50 years.  Should you choose to continue with Pediatric Affiliates, call NJ FamilyCare at 1-800-701-0710 for information on the process that you must follow in order to change to one of the previously named plans

Since we understand that it is currently taking approximately 2-4 months to change plans, it is important to begin the process immediately in order for your new coverage to be in place by July 1, 2019.  When calling, be sure to have available your Case/Policy number and your home zip code, or the Social Security number and date of the individual(s) covered under the policy.

If you have any questions concerning this  matter, please do not hesitate to call any of our offices.
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